Almost No One Is There

This article pissed me off when I first read it. I looked it over & over and then decided it might be a good thing. In his usual thorough style of analysis, he has proven once and for all that an apple is NOT an orange! Alert the media! He starts with a false premise right at the start of the second paragraph, because as I have written before
MICRO.BLOG IS NOT A TWITTER ALTERNATIVE.
He probably didn’t see it when I wrote that before, as he may not follow me, since I am not a celebrity and not important enough for him to bother with. But here’s the good part. Surely he promoted his article on Twitter too. And maybe, just maybe, he’s a major force over there, an influencer, a thought leader. Which means his article might convince a lot of people who have started to look for a Twitter alternative to not even bother checking out Micro.blog. That’s a good thing, because
MICRO.BLOG IS NOT A TWITTER ALTERNATIVE.

Micro.blog is a place for microbloggers and bloggers to write. It was created by Manton & Jean as a safe place for bloggers to write content that they would own, and it has grown and grown, serving that purpose for more and more bloggers. It’s not a place for rubbing elbows with the famous (and infamous), nor a place for making important announcements, nor a good career move, nor a good place to be seen by the really important people, nor another good place among many for cross-posting your latest article, review, editorial or rant. Bloggers are just . . . well, bloggers, and yes, some were born that way and some are doing their best to learn how to be bloggers, some succeeding better than others. But folks are finding that being around microbloggers is a good thing, kinda fun, as they tend to be able to express themselves and even have civilized conversations with others, you know, LIVE, in the moment, conversations.

It’s the Twitter users who want to become (or already are) bloggers and/or microbloggers who might find a nice home at Micro.blog! And they might find that new home is actually nothing like Twitter. They might even discover that our Jack is better than theirs, and they might even make some new friends.

I was ripe for Micro.blog, because my writing had gotten scattered all over the Internet. I had blogs on Blogger, Posthaven, MyWord Editor,Blogspot, posthaven again, 1999.io, and at least three others that are now dead, llnks not possible. So I jumped at the idea of owning my own content and signed up for Manton’s Kickstarter. As for genes, my cousin once pointed out that my father was the story teller of our extended family. After eating big holiday turkeys and my mother’s legendary cherry pies or lemon meringue pies, we would all sit back while the fathers told stories. My cousin was right, my father’s were the best. I got those story telling genes. I took to Micro.blog immediately, even though I couldn’t even post a picture in the beginning and I was surrounded by Apple nerds from the very start.

For me, Micro.blog has become a worthy alternative to an Old Folks Home.

P. S. The title of this article is taken from THAT article, two paragraphs up from his discussion of App.net. It’s the line that pissed me off the most. And his line about people not sticking around is not the least bit true, in my experience on the service. I’m still interacting regularly with other folks who were there on day one. Maybe he should become a blogger, he seems to be good at telling stories.